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Full text of "P & S ... : the yearbook of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University in the city of New York"

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THE LIBRARIES 
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 



HEALTH SCIENCES 
LIBRARY 




(MMI^MMI^MMIMLU 



DEPARTMENT of OBSTETRICS »a ECOLOGY 
foUJMS.PRESBYTERlAN MEDICAL CENTER 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Metropolitan New York Library Council - METRO 



http://www.archive.org/details/psyearbookofcoll1962colu 




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Above, left: King's College. Below, left: College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons at 3 Barclay Street, 1813-1837. Above: 
College of Physicians and Surgeons at Fourth Avenue and 
Twenty-third Street, 1856-1887. Below: College of Physicians 
and Surgeons at Fifty-ninth Street, 1887-1928. 




■ 




1, 3 a 







College of 
Physicians and 
Surgeons 



19 6 2 



Columbia University 

in the 
City of New York 



To Virginia Kneeland Frantz and Yale Kneeland, Jr., this book is 
dedicated with warm and affectionate appreciation. 

Standing astride the undergraduate world like the proverbial 
Colossus, one foot planted firmly in Surgery, the other in Medicine, 
you have instructed successive generations of students in the basic 
concepts of your respective fields. With incisive wit and irrepres- 
sible humor, through anecdote, reminiscence, and precise experi- 
mental and clinical data, you have made learning seem effortless 
and an unfailingly rewarding experience. Those privileged to attend 
your lectures and bedside rounds have been enriched beyond measure 
in the art of your ancient profession. 



The Oath of Hippocrates 



1 swear by Apollo the physician, and Aesculapius, and Hygeia, and 
Panacea, and all the gods and goddesses, that according to my ability 
and judgment I will keep this oath and this stipulation: to reckon 
him who taught me this Art equally dear to me as my parents, to share 
my substance with him and relieve his necessities if required; to look 
upon his offspring as my own brothers and to teach them this Art, if 
they shall wish to learn it, without fee or stipulation; and that by pre- 
cept, lecture, and every other mode of instruction I will impart a knowl- 
edge of the Art to my sons and those of my teachers, and to disciples 
bound by a stipulation and oath according to the law of medicine, but 
to none others. I will follow that system of regimen which according to 
my ability and judgment I consider for the benefit of my patients, and 
abstain from whatever is deleterious and mischievous. I will give no 
deadly medicine to anyone if asked, nor suggest any such counsel; and 
in like manner I will not give to a woman a pessary to produce abortion. 
With purity and with holiness I will pass my life and practice my Art. 
I will not cut persons laboring under the stone, but will leave this to be 
done by men who are practitioners of this work. Into whatever houses I 
enter I will go into them for the benefit of the sick and will abstain from 
every voluntary act of mischief and corruption; and further, from the 
seduction of females or males, freemen and slaves. Whatever, in con- 
nection with my professional practice or not in connection with it, I see 
or hear in the life of men which ought not to be spoken of abroad, I will 
not divulge, as reckoning that all such should be kept secret. While I 
continue to keep this oath unviolated may it be granted to me to enjoy 
life and the practice of the Art, respected by all men and all times. But 
should I trespass and violate this oath may the reverse be my lot. 



The Class of 1962 

College of 

Physicians and 

Surgeons 




A. BERNARD ACKERMAN 
A.B., Princeton, 1958 
963 Park Avenue 
Elizabeth 3, N. J. 



THOMAS E. ALLEN 

A. B., Princeton, 1958 

4929 N. Bartlett 

Milwaukee, Wis. 




NEWELL A. AUGUR, JR. 
B. E., Yale 1958 
6450 Ellenwood Avenue 
St. Louis 5, Mo. 



FRED L. BAKER 

A.B., Wabash, 1958 

1103 Jackson Street 

Chvensboro, Ky. 




PETER B. BARLOW 

A. B., Harvard, 1958 
157 Engle Street 
Englewood, N. J. 



MVLES M. BEHRENS 

A.B., Yale, 1958 

6 Weir Lane 

Locust Valley, N. Y. 



DONALD C. BELL 
A.B., Wooster, 1953 
B.D., Chicago, 1956 
1262 Palmer Street 
Wooster, Ohio 



H. GLENN BELL, JR. 

A.B., Stanford, 195S 

184 Lunado Way 

San Francisco 27, Calif. 




ROBINETTE NIXON BELL 

A.B., Smith, 1951 
1262 Palmer Street 
Wooster, Ohio 



jfP?^.. 



KENNETH J. BERKES, JR. 

A.B., Hamilton, 195S 

1516 Kingston Avenue 

Baldwin, N. Y. 




i 




HOWARD H. BERMAN 

A.B., Duke, 195S 
35 Deerfield Drive 
Chestnut Hill Estates 
Ellicott City, Md. 



STEPHEN BEZAHLER 

A. B., Williams, 1958 

1212 Haddon Avenue 

Camden 3, N. J. 







HENRY MYERS BOWERS, JR. 

A. B., Princeton, 1957 

519 Meadow Drive West 

Wilmette, 111. 



COURTNEY WARREN 

BROWN 

A.B., Williams, 1957 

4 Kent Road 

Scarsdale, N. Y. 



RICHARD M. BROWN 

A.B., Princeton, 1958 

652 Kingston Road 

Princeton, N. J. 



HAROLD M. BRUCK 

A. B., Hamilton, 195 S 

2406 Seymour Avenue 

Union, N. J. 



JOHN C. M. BRUST, JR. 

A.B., Harvard, 195S 

318 Berkeley Drive 

Syracuse 10, N. Y. 



MARCIA BUCKLEY BULL 

A. B., Mount Holyoke, 195S 

c/o Mrs. D. C. Bull 

Woodbury, Conn. 









SHERMAN M. BULL 

A.B., Yale, 1958 

c/o Mrs. D. C. Bull 

Woodbury, Conn. 



DONALD A. BURRESS 

A.B.. Ripon, 1955 

B. S., M. S., MIT, 1956 

295 Bennett Avenue 

New York 40, N. Y. 



JAMES M. CAMPBELL 

A.B., Yale, 195S 

18301 Douglas Road 

South Bend, Ind. 



lLBERT r. casazza 


PETER A. CASSILETH 


DONALD CATON 


A.B., Princeton, 1958 


A.B., Union, 1958 


B. S._, Yale, 1958 


790 5th Street 


720 West 170 Street 


7535 17th Street, N.W 


Secaucus, N. J. 


New York 32, N. Y. 


Washington 12, D. C. 






11 




SOLAN CHAO 

A.B., Cornell, 1954 

895 West End Avenue 

New York, N. Y. 





EDWARD D. COATES 
A.B., Yale, 1958 

1411 El Miradero Avenue 
Glendale I, Calif. 



DONALD S. COHEN 

A.B., Hamilton, 1958 

21 Beach Road 

Port Jervis, N. Y. 



PETER F. COHN 

A.B., Columbia, 1958 

148 Chalford Lane 

Scarsdale, N. Y. 



DESPINE L. COULIS 

A.B., Smith, 195S 

32 Lafayette Place 

Salem, Mass. 



STANLEY J. COEN 

A.B., Columbia, 1958 

610 West 174 Street 

New York 33, N. Y. 






12 




WILLIAM G. COVEY 

A.B., Columbia, 195S 

360 Cabrini Blvd. 

New York 40, N. Y. 








BETTY SHANNON DANES 

A.B.,Mt. Holyoke, 1948 

M.A., Texas 1949 

Ph. D., Iowa, 1952 

145 South Bay Avenue 

Brightwaters, N. Y. 



LEONARD G. DAUBER 

A.B., Columbia, 1958 

5511-11 Avenue 

Brooklyn 19, N.Y. 



HOWARD V. DUBIN 

A.B., Columbia, 1958 

2727 University Avenue 

New York 68, N. Y. 






WILLIAM C. DUNCAN III 
A.B., Princeton, 1958 
78 Pomeroy Terrace 
Northampton, Mass. 




STEPHEN V. FLAGG 

B. S., Yale, 1957 

325 Walnut Street 

Englewood, N. J. 




13 




EARL VICTOR FOGELBERG 
A. B., Princeton, 1958 
4002 N. Kenmore 
Chicago 13, 111. 



HOWARD A. FOX 

B. S., Union, 195-1 

99-52 66th Road 

Forest Hills 74, N. Y. 





HERMAN MORRIS 

FRANKEL 
A.B., Columbia, 1958 
2212 East 7th Street 
Brooklyn 23, N. Y. 



ANDREW J. FRANZONE 

A. B., Holy Cross, 1958 

81-07 169 Street 

Jamaica 32, N. Y. 





ARTHUR S. GELLER 
A.B., Williams, 1958 
103 Cedar Lane 
Great Neck, N. Y. 



ROBERT B. GOLLANCE 

A. B., Harvard, 1958 

600 Albany Avenue 

Brooklyn 3, N. Y. 




14 




JOHN P. GRANT, JR. 
A.B., Amherst, 1954 
10 Colonial Court 
New Canaan, Conn. 



PARKE H. GRAY 
A.B.. Williams, 1958 

100 Westerly Terrace 
Hartford, Conn. 







ROBERT A. GUTSTEIN 
A.B., Colgate, 1958 
147 Lan^ham Street 
Brooklyn 35, N. Y. 



JACOB I. HAFT 

A.B., Harvard, 1958 

55 Bremond Street 

Belleville 9, N.J. 





EDWIN HANKIN 
A.B., Columbia, 1958 
415 Lefferts Avenue 
Brooklyn 25, N. Y. 



ROBERT M. HERZBERG 

A. B., Reed, 1958 

741 Greentree Road 

Pacific Palisades, Calif. 

15 




NORBERT HIRSCHHORN 

A.B., Columbia, 195S 

853 Riverside Drive 

New York 32, N. Y. 



FRED S. HURST 

A.B., Princeton, 1958 

70 Haven Avenue 

New York 32, N. Y. 



PETER A. IMMORDINO 

A.B., New York University, 195 S 

107 Cox Avenue 

Yonkers 5, N. Y. 









WARREN D. JOHNSON, JR. 

B. S., Carroll, 1958 

Faulkner Road 

Gurnee, 111. 



JOEL S. KARLINER 

A.B., Columbia, 195S 

4501 Park Avenue 

Union City, N.J. 



JOHN KELLEY 

A.B., Brown, 1957 

Box W 
Southampton, N. Y. 



16 



HOWARD LEE KILBURX 

A.B., University of 

Washington, 195S 

304 South Mission Street 

Wenatchee, Wash. 



JAMES D. S. KIM 

A. B., Bowdoin, 1957 

Box 65 

Harrison, Me. 



WILLIAM J. KLEIN, JR. 

A.B., Cincinnati, 1958 

1256 Rossmore Avenue 

Cincinnati 37, Ohio 









I 



JOHN S. KOVACH 

A. B., Princeton, 1958 

14381 Onaway Road 

Shaker Heights 20, Ohio 



JOEL A. KRAUT 

A. B., Princeton, 1958 

245 Stegman Street 

Jersey City 5, N.J. 



MARY JEANNE KREEK 

A.B., Wellesley, 1958 

4636 Verplanck Place, N. W. 

Washington, D. C. 



17 




IRVING J. LERNER 

A. B., Yale, 1958 

1346 Avon Drive 

Cincinnati 29, Ohio 





WILLIAM P. LOVEJOY 

A. B., Yale, 1956 

Oldwick, N. J. 



JONATHAN LEVINE 

A.B., Columbia, 1958 

2370 Ocean Avenue 

Brooklyn 29, N. Y. 



RICHARD S. McCRAY 
A.B., Wesleyan, 1954 

B. D., Yale, 1957 

229 Cornell Avenue 

Swarthmore, Pa. 



HENRY R. McCARROLL 

A.B., Princeton, 1958 

#4 Ladue Acres 

St. Louis 24, Mo. 





LAWRENCE NOEL 

MARGOLIES 

A.B., Columbia, 195S 

1425 Thieriot Avenue 

New York 60, N. Y. 




18 




MICHAEL N. MARGOLIES 

A. B., Harvard, 195 S 

66-10 149 Street 

Flushing 67, N. Y. 





ROBERT L. MILLER 

A.B., Hamilton, 1958 

319 Glen Avenue 

Elmira, N. Y. 



CLEMENT E. MARKS, JR. 

A.B., Dartmouth, 195S 

318 East Locust Street 

Bethlehem, Pa. 



PETER JAY MOLOY 
A. B., Harvard, 1958 
4683 Waldo Avenue 
New York 71, N.Y. 



PETER JOHN MILLHEISER 

A. B., Columbia, 1957 

985 Anderson Avenue 

New York 52, N. Y. 




SCOTT MURPHY 

A.B., Yale, 195S 

Apt. 607-C 

Alden Park Manor 

Wissahickon Drive 

Philadelphia, Pa. 




19 



MARTIN S. NADEL 
A. B., Hamilton, 1957 
333 Ovington Avenue 
Brooklyn 9, N. Y. 



KHOSROW NASR 

B. S., Yale, 1958 

Safi-AIi Shah Avenue 

Tehran. Iran 




IAN NISONSON 
A.B., Columbia, 195S 
281 Reservoir Place 
Bronx 67, N. Y. 



EDWARD A. OPPENHEIMER 

A.B., Columbia, 195 8 

853 Seventh Avenue 

New York 19, N.Y. 




SALVATORE J. PAGLIARO 
A.B., Columbia, 1958 
685 East 228 Street 
New York, N. Y. 



PETER V. PARRY 

A.B. 7 Hofstra,1958 

54 Fenimore Street 

Lynbrook, N. Y. 




20 




ROBERT R. PASCAL 
A.B., Columbia, 195 8 
96 Haven Avenue 
New York 32, N. Y. 



DAVID J. PATEK 

A. B., Harvard, 1958 

1215 Fifth Avenue 

New York, N. Y. 




PAUL J. PEASE 
A.B., Miami, 1958 
11376-503N 
Lewisbur^, Ohio 



PETER J. PUCHNER 

A. B., Carleton, 1958 
716 N. 9th Street 
Manitowoc, Wis. 




GANSON PURCELL, JR. 

A.B., Williams; 1958 

3000 Woodland Drive N. W. 
Washington 8, D. C. 



ROBERT E. REBER 

A.B., Ohio, 1958 

351 Franklin Street 

Circleville, Ohio 






ELIHU N. ROOT 

B. S., College of the City 

of N. Y., 1958 

610 West 174 Street 

New York 33, N. Y. 



THOMAS S. REESE 
A. B., Harvard, 1957 

4233 Silsby 
Cleveland 18, Ohio 



NICHOLAS A. ROMAS 

A.B., Colgate, 1958 

1911 Tracy Street 

Endicott, N. Y. 



BARBARA J. ROSEN 

B. S., Simmons, 1956 

M. S., Vassar, 1958 

7 Bussey Lane 

Dedham, Mass. 



JEROME E. RYGORSKY 

A.B., New York University, 1958 

166 East 56 Street 

Brooklyn 3, N. Y. 





EUGENE R. SCHIFF 

A. B., Michigan, 1958 

1027 Egan Hills Drive 

Cincinnati 29, Ohio 




22 




TIMOTHY S. SCHUSTER 

A.B., Harvard, 1958 

27 Erick Avenue 

Hewlett, X. Y. 





GABRIEL H. SCHWARTZ 
A. B., Princeton, 195S 

131 Esplanade 
Mount Vernon, N. Y. 



BOYD H. SE1DEXBERG 

A.B., Columbia, 195S 

1150 Pelham Parkway South 

New York, N. Y. 



SPEXCER E. SHERMAX 
A.B., Princeton, 195S 

1199 Park Avenue 
New York 28, N. Y. 



STEPHEX E. SILVER 

A.B., Princeton, 1958 
225 Sterling Place 
Brooklyn 38, N. Y. 



|OHX XEWCOMB 

SHEAGREN 

A.B., Carleton, 1957 

823 King Street 

Rockford, 111. 






23 





FRANK REES SMITH 

A.B., Dartmouth, 1959 

1401 Woodlawn Park Drive 

Flint 3, Mich. 




TIMOTHY H. SMELZER 

A. B., Hamilton, 1958 

620 S. Linden Avenue 

Pittsburgh 8, Pa. 



HENRY A. SOLOMON 

A.B., Columbia, 195S 

270 Dover Street 

Brooklyn 35, N. Y. 



THOMAS H. STEELE 

B. S., Haverford, 1958 

206 Euclid Avenue 

New Castle, Pa. 



FRANZ H. STEWART, JR. 

A. B., Emory, 1958 

4021 Kiaora Street 

Miami 33, Fla. 




ALTON L. STEINER 

A. B., Harvard, 1958 

469 Woodlawn Avenue 

Albany 8, N. Y. 





24 





ROBERT D. THOMPSON 

A.B., Princeton, 1958 

326 Dorchester Road 

Akron 20, Ohio 




BERNARD TALBOT 

A.B., Columbia, 1958 

1024 Walton Avenue 

New York 52, N. Y. 



RICHARD I. ULIN 
B. S., Franklin and 

Marshall, 1958 

70 Haven Avenue 

New York 32, N. Y. 



JAMES W. VALUSKA 
A. B., Princeton, 1958 
328 McLister Avenue 
Mingo Junction, Ohio 



JAMES M. VOGEL 

A.B., Wesleyan, 1958 

M.A., Wesleyan, 1959 

51 East 90 Street 

New York, N. Y. 




KYTJA KERWYN VOELLER 

A. B., Reed, 1953 

M.A., Bryn Mawr, 1958 

106 Haven Avenue 

New York 32, N. Y. 





25 




BARRY R. WALKER 

A.B., Yale, 1958 

1132 N. 13th Street 

Reading, Pa. 



ROBERT S. WALDBAUM 

A.B., Columbia, 1958 

1548 East 24 Street 

Brooklyn 10, N. Y. 





K. WILLIAM 

WATERSON, JR. 

B. S., Washington and Lee, 195S 

P. O. Box 186 

Chelsea, Vt. 



FORREST F. WEIGHT, JR 

A.B., Princeton, 1958 

40 Jackson Avenue 

Middletown, N. Y. 





MARC E. WEKSLER 

A.B., Swarthmore, 1958 

835 Red Road 

Teaneck, N. J. 



JOEL DAVID WEINSTEIN 

A. B., Princeton, 195S 

3912 Walnut Grove Road 

Memphis, Tenn. 




26 




ROBERT B. WINSLOW 

A. B., Princeton, 1958 

Silver Spring Road 

Ridgefield, Conn. 



JOHN J. WHITE, JR. 
A.B., Yale, 195 S 

72 Boulevard 
Glen Rock, N. J. 





HOWARD J. ZEFT 

A.B., Princeton, 1958 

1207 Tyson Avenue 

Philadelphia 11, Pa. 



Lost to Follow-Up 




Left: 

ANNE van N. GAMBLE, 
Pediatrics 
Right: 

PAUL M. MOSHER, 
Surgery 
Below: 

RICHARD C. ORAHOOD, 
Surgery 






Left: 

MICHAEL L. RAPPAPORT, 
Pathology 
Right: 

THOMAS A. WILLIAMS, 
Psychiatry 




27 



Alpha Omega Alpha 



THIRD YEAR 

Myles M. Behrens 
Peter A. Cassileth 
Michael N. Margolies 
Michael L. Rappaport 
Jerome E. Rygorsky 
Gabriel H. Schwartz 



FOURTH YEAR 



Henry M. Bowers, Jr. 
John C. M. Brust, Jr. 
Donald A. Burress 
Jacob I. Haft 
William J. Klein, Jr. 
John S. Kovach 
Irving J. Lerner 



Jonathan Levine 
Paul J. Pease 
John N. Sheagren 
Frank R. Smith 
Robert S. Waldbaum 
Joel D. Weinstein 
Marc E. Weksler 



Class Officers 



FIRST YEAR 

Bernard Ackerman President 

Timothy Smelzer Vice President 

Marcia Bull Secretary 

James Valuska Treasurer 

THIRD YEAR 

Warren Johnson President 

John White Vice President 

Barbara Rosen Secretary 

Irving Lerner -. . Treasurer 



SECOND YEAR 

Robert Waldbaum President 

Richard McCray Vice President 

Barbara Rosen Secretary 

David Patek Treasurer 

FOURTH YEAR 

Glenn Bell President 

Myles Behrens Vice Presiden t 

Barbara Rosen Secretary 

Eugene Schiff Treasurer 



28 



The Class of 1963 

'64 



'65 



College of 

Physicians and 

Surgeons 



Administrative Staff 



29 






I f^ft^lfffPffe ? 




^^^-^♦T^?-' 



First Row: Paul C. Redmond, John Dennis, Jon S. Pearl, Suzanne Oparil, Stephen M. Berger, Manuel F. Yvars, Jim I. Urbach. 
Second Row: William D. Mattern, Ronald L. Price, James H. Blake, Robert F. Bohnen, Robert H. Nenninger, John Dennis 
Baker, William J. Nape, Sanford A. Ratzan, Charles Scielzo, Michael G. Schulman, Samuel E. Rofman, Jacob D. Miller, Donald 
R. Bergsma, Stephen Falk, Richard N. Edie, Thomas S. Cottrcll, Ronald K. St. John. 



First Year 



First Row. Ronald K. St. John, Barry F. Portnoy, Brent W. Lambert, Francis M. Weld, Joan W. Wlodkoski, Ruth Embrec, An- 
gelo J. Lopano, John P. Lyden. Second Row: Lawrence Z. Stern. Norman D. Brown, Joseph A. MacFarland, George Longstrath, 
Thomas M. Murray, Bruce M. Forester, James K. Mooney, Harlow K. H. Brodie, Daniel A. Myerson, Paul J. Myerson, Thomas 
L. Delbanco, Daniel Kripke, Avrum Zvi Bluming, Paul H. Hamada, Bard X. Hall, Eric H. Johnson. 




30 



p " r \ p c n ? ? f ? n f p ^ f 




Krai Ron;: Richard T. O Brien. James R. Cole, Keng-Yong Ng. Shirley N.-H. Pan, Virginia Biddle, Keat-Jin Lee, Oscar B. Gar- 
fein, David J. Schurman. Second Row: Stephen Kurtin, James J, Branscom, Jr., Roger W. MacMillan, Ashley T. Haase, Ronald 
K. St. John, Stanton D. Hale, James J. Eking, Jay A. Levy, Frederick P. Siegal, Lynn M. Peterson, Robert F. Schreiber, Philip 
Hertz. Stuart R. Rose, George I. Mallis, Harry A. Ackley. 



1965 



First Row: Jacob D. Mercy, James W. Faulk, Stephen M. Slaton Scheidt, Roberta L. Abelson, Dorothy E. Spiegel, Diana G. 
Symington, Eleanor S. Schuker, Nathaniel Reichek. Norman M. Finkclstein. Richard P. Perkins. Second Row: Peter L. Wein- 
garten, Joel Weintraub, Harvey W. Caplan, Anthony H. Horan, William B. Caskey, William J. Davis, Richard C. Wallace, 
Daniel C. Bryant, William A. H. McLean, Howard N. Ginsburg. Theodore H. Stanley, Robert P. Lisak, Michael D. Iseman, 
Richard H. Thompson. Jr., William B. McCullagh, Samuel M. Sobol, David M. Borkenhagen, Darwin Labarthe, Michael B. 
Schachter, John W. Hadden. 



c r . n r \ *\ r r r ^ 



r. 




31 




First Row: Bruce H. l'latnik, Michael L. Gelfand, Michael A. Friedburg, Samuel O.. Essandoh. Second Row: David R. Nank, 
Franklin S. Musgrave, Cedric W. Porter, Jr., Robert L. Boothe, Arthur H. Hoyte, Ansis Zamelis. 



Second Year 1964 



First Row: William H. Lawrence, Jr., Joseph G. McCarthy, Peter T. Kirchner, Matthew M. Redder, Geoffrey B. Wright, Philip 
y. Rogal, Barry Davidson. Second Row: Jeanne R. Willner, Davida E. Taylor. Stephen J. DoctorofF, Katherine Hart, Robert T. 
Ogawa, Jane A. Jamison. Third Row; James E. Culver, Jr., William G. Friend, B. Edward Turvey, Jr., J. William Stilley, Preston 
Zucker, Eugene S. Mayer, Robert D. Lewis, Stephen F. Wang, William R. Vetter, Martin G. Groder, Robert T. Ricketts. William 
G. Hamilton. 




32 




First Row: Murray Epstein, Elisabeth McSherry, 
Jerry A. Wider. Second Row: Jonathan L. Scrxner, 
Leslie Baer, Alan D. Manzler. 




First Row: David M. M usher, Susan M. Dcakins, David Beck 
Davidson, Richard A. Dickey. Second Row: Roger David 
Cohen, Louis E. Dickinson, Harvard Yale Muhm, Thomas A. 
Williams. Gene Hoff, Terrance M. Daugharty. 



Third Year 



1963 



First Row: Mayer R. Lightdale. John S. Simmonds, M. Lanier Anderson, Babette Weksler, Barbara Jo Scrber, Albert V. Assali, 
Mark E. Kahn. Second Row: William Jordan Aronson, Neil R. Blacklow. Martin P. Geller, William J. Schneider, Clifton M. 
Howard, George W. Jordan. Martin G. Rosenblatt. Robert H. Hcissenbuttal, George S. Mauerman, George S. Harell, Alfred 
Leonard Scherzcr, Dean Scott Wood, James Christopher Reynolds, W. Jost Mickelsen, Clyde W. Chun, Thomas Parks. 



f 'I > 



WV^Wt^tffft 



WMA 






33 



Below and right: AURA E. SEVERINGHAUS, Associate Dean 
and Secretary of the Faculty of Medicine, Columbia University. 



"■—«.■* Of^tk^. 



4~*.~f~t*.^ 



1 *>l 

1 AU -~J»Xs, 4 ^. 














Kig/li: EUNICE W. BODINE, Secretary to the Dean. Below-left: 
HANSEL BAUGH of the Bookstore; center: NICOLA RUSSELL 
of the Bookstore: The sensitive soul, darling, finds poetry in 
a proctology textbook; and, right: ARVONA MEMORY, Bursar. 







34 



llpf^ 




Right-above: LENA SCHLAFMITZ, Secretary to Mr. 
Barton; and, below. PATRICK. HAYES, Director of Bard 
Hail. Below. Bard Hall, the haven away from home. 




Lefv. EDWIN M. BARTON Director of Student Activities 
and the I» 8c S Club. 





The P & S Club is concerned with the 
extracurricular activities of the medical 
students through a broad program of 
social, spiritual, athletic, and cultural activi- 
ties. The program is carried out by more 
than twenty student committees . . . Every 
matriculated student in the School of Medi- 
cine is automatically a member. 
Bard Hall [is] the residence for students of 
the Medical School [and its] facilities include 
lounging rooms, a dining room, a cafeteria 
and grillroom, a gymnasium, squash courts, 
and a swimming pool. 



35 



PERSPECTIVE College of 

Physicians and 
Surgeons 



On August 14, 1767, by action of the 
Board of Governors, King's College 
Medical School became the second medi- 
cal college to be established in the American 
Colonies. Two years later, on May 16, 1769, 
Robert Tucker and Samuel Kissam received 
the first degrees of Bachelor of Medicine 
given by the College. The following year 
Tucker received the M. D. degree, the first 
doctorate of medicine given in course in this 
country. In this way, the institution of which 
we are direct descendants began. 

The world into which the class of 1962 
emerges is a far different one from that 
which confronted Tucker and Kissam nearly 
two hundred years ago. On the year of their 
graduation, Daniel Boone began his explora- 
tion of Kentucky and Napoleon Bonaparte 
was born. Seventeen years earlier, Ben Frank- 
lin had proved while flying his kite in a 
thunderstorm that lightning is electricity. 
Six years before, following the battle of 
Quebec, the French had lost Canada and the 
American Midwest when they signed the 
Peace of Paris ending the Seven Years War. 
And at that time, the British were putting 
economic and political pressures on the 
Thirteen Colonies which were to erupt into 
the Boston Tea Party four years later, the 
signing of the Declaration of Independence, 
and the War of the Revolution. 



The medical environment of their day 
was likewise radically different. Death rates 
all over the world were staggering, even in 
the most civilized countries. The terror of 
epidemics was almost as menacing as to- 
day's nuclear threats. Smallpox, yellow fever, 
typhoid, diphtheria, malaria, cholera, and 
many others were regarded as natural or 
divinely inspired disasters against which 
man was powerless. Life expectancy every- 
where was far below what it is today, with 
one fourth of the population doomed before 
the age of five. The disciplines of medicine 
were completely inadequate and science 
was frequently viewed with alarm. In many 
places, it was considered the wicked heresey 
of tampering with Divine Will. In Tucker's 
and Kissam's day, the vast majority of people 
depended upon home remedies, supersti- 
tions, and travelling quacks for the treat- 
ment of their ills. Operations were per- 
formed, for the most part, by barbers. 

It was against this background that the 
first faculty of King's College Medical School 
was established. It consisted of six men who 
had received most of their training in Eu- 
rope: Dr. Samuel Clossey, Professor of Ana- 
tomy; Dr. Peter Middleton, Professor of 
Physiology and Pathology; Dr. John Jones, 
Professor of Surgery (who attended Ben 
Franklin and George Washington at different 

(Continued on page 39) 



36 




LI 



» 



Left; Rclton McCarolI and Larry Margolies in 
Biochemistry lab: a snappy retort. Below: Ann 
Gamble: true false unrelated, false true related, 
tralse few; and Al Casazza and Jerry Rygorsky: 
double your pleasure, double your fun. 



Below: Tom Reese and Des Coulis: at work on the glutei. 
I J 





Itelow left: Pete Immordino, Bob Gollance, and Ichabod Crane. Below right: Mike 
Rappaport: Look what it says— 'this bag is not a toy; keep away from children.' 






37 










38 



Opposite— Above left and tight: On the 86th consecutive 
attempt, Hal Bruck finally hits the little red line. Center 
left: Sal Pagliaro experiencing venipuncture: Butcher! Center 
right: Howie Bcrman: it's okay, I'm only resting my eyes: 
and Bert Hirschorn at exam time: a crib sheet is concealed 
in his cuff. 



{Continued front page 3G) 

times over the years) ; Dr. James Smith, Pro- 
fessor of Chemistry and Materia Medica; 
Dr. Samuel Bard, Professor of the Theory 
and Practice of Physic; and Dr. John V. B. 
Tennent, Professor of Midwifery. 

Tucker and Kissam learned much by 
observing anatomical dissection by Profes- 
sor Middleton who in 1750 had performed 
the first anatomical dissection for medical 
instruction in the colonies on the body of 
Herennaus Carroll who had been executed 
for murder. They had at their disposal the 
advances in medical investigation from Pa- 
dua, Leyden, Paris, London, and Edinburgh. 
They knew of William Harvey's studies of 
the circulatory system which had been carried 
out one hundred and fifty years earlier, and 
they had available the microscope developed 
by Anton van Leeuwenhoek who had lived 
one hundred years before. They may have 
known of the different types of germs which 
were first seen and described in 1683 and 
known to be inactiviated by boiling, but they 
did not connect these to the etiology of dis- 
ease. 

(Continued on page 84) 





^ ' 



Opposite—Left: Bob Gollance listening to his first lub- 
dupp-gleep; and right: Howie Dubin discovering (?) his first 
case of drepanocytosis. Right— above to below: Mike Mar- 
golics and Howie Fox discovering the techniques of otorhino- 
laryngology: open . . . wide . . . wider . . . aargh! 




39 






Above left: At Bard Hall dinner: . . . and we put it in Bill 
Duncan's soup. Above: Ed Hankin and Jack Haft:... and 
then I dropped my binoculars. Left: Eli Root on a field 
trip: Schering down three-eighths. Below: Bob Herzberg in 
lab: is that definitive? 




Above: Mike Margolics studying: 
. . . oxaloacetic reacts with . . . and 
then Sprinson picked up the chalk 
... malic to . . 




40 



The Faculty 

College of 

Physicians and 

Surgeons 



41 



Below: WILFRED M. COPENHAVER, Professor of Anat- 
omy: If you give me a few days, it'll all come back to me. 



Below: DOROTHY JOHNSON, Assistant Professor of 
Anatomy: I did too have primary responsibility for Chap- 
ters 15, 16, 17, and 21. 






Above: GEORGE K. SMELSER, Professor of Anatomy: 
Now, let's see, if we regard the eye as a matzoh ball . . . 
Below: GEORGE D. PAPPAS, Assistant Professor of 
Anatomy: Then screw wing nut 'E' into flange 'B' and . . . 




Below: FREDERICK J. AGATE, Associate Professor of 
Anatomy: Let me tell you about my screeming preemies. 
Far below: MELVIN L. MOSS. Associate Professor of 
Anatomv: Two zebras . . . 





42 





Above: CHARLES R. XOBACK, As- 
sociate Professor of Anatomy: I'm sure 
it will all fit together. 




Above: MALCOLM B. CARPENTER, 
Associate Professor of Anatomy: You 
don't seem to understand the point of 
the course. 



Below left: CHARLES A. ELY, Assistant Professor of Anatomy: . . . then squeeze 
acutely and your opponent will be completely disabled. Below right: HERBERT 
O. ELFTMAN, Associate Professor of Anatomy: No, I don't get a share of the 
gold teeth. 






Above: ALBERT FREYER, Elliot 
Ness Professor of Applied Anatomy: 
the cadaver keeper. 



43 




Above: MAGNUS I. GREGERSEN, John C. 
Dalton Professor of Physiology: You don't want 
a reprint; then get out! 




The Preclinical Sciences 

The general purpose of a medical school 
is to train physicians and surgeons. Be- 
cause this training is constantly under- 
going changes resulting from advances made 
in experimental medicine and its allied 
sciences, the student must realize at the start 
that his task is to obtain a foundation which 
will not crumble under these advances. He 
must develop the capacity to alter his con- 
cepts according to new facts, and establish 
the habit of assimilating these facts in such 
a way that they will increase his confidence 
in his own resources even as he finds some 
of his earlier training misconceived. Much 
of what he will learn rests upon insecure 



Left: WILLIAM L. NASTUK, Professor of Physiology: 
Ring-a-ding-ding. Below left: ROBERT J. DELLEN- 
BACK, Assistant Professor of Physiology: Archie An- 
drews. Below. SHU CHIEN, Assistant Professor of 
Physiology: Quiet, we're getting the mainland. 





44 




- 




- I T\ 


JL &, K'-nA <*<". i — 


^k ]L a.^.,A/4w >V J, «^ 


vflpSE 


J ** i | 


— — - *• W^ ~~~ 3 




isF*^ — - 


^*-^cr. 



<4fcoi/e; WILLIAM W. WALCOTT, Associate Professor 
of Phvsiologv: When it does that, is it lub or dupp? 
Below': WALTER S. ROOT, Professor of Physiology: 
I got it at Barney's: you like it? 




r 




—t' 


- n,- f *-^: 

In (P \l 1 


1 


^ 


m 


w, .. 


jb -;**/-jt« 


1 


.5.. 


^ 



Above: LOUIS J. CIZEK, Associate Professor of Physiology: The clarity 
of renal physiology. Below: WERNER R. LOEWENSTEIN, Associate 
Professor of Physiology: It's 'ow and noahw that keep me in my place. 



experimental evidence— is indeed empirical. 
Other phases of his work will be well founded. 
He must learn to distinguish between the 
two. This he can do only by drawing his 
own conclusions from what he regards, after 
careful consideration, to be well-established 
facts. Such a scientific attitude, acquired 
early and practiced throughout his course, 
is the student's most valuable weapon for 
his medical training . . . 

The aim of the preclinical sciences is 
to train the student to make his own obser- 
vations, in order that these may form the 
groundwork upon which he builds his knowl- 
edge. In many instances, the techniques he 
employs are also to be his tools in clinical 
studies and it is important that he examine 
them critically with respect to their validity 

(Continued on page 52) 




45 





Far left: DAVID SHEMIN, Professor 
of Biochemistry: So I make a little 
alcohol on the side; so who's it gonna 
hurt. Left: DAVID RITTENBERG. 
Professor of Biochemistry: Yes, I'm 
back, but where's Judge Crater? 
Below: ALVIN I. KRASNA, Assistant 
Professor of Biochemistry: I forget, 
am I 'x' or V. Far below: DAVID 
NACHMANSON, Professor of Neurol- 
ogy: Und den de giant sqvid vent limp. 



Below: HEINRICH B. WAELSCH, Professor of Biochemistry: 
All we found out about ammonia and the brain is that it 
makes my eyes tear. 





Below left: ERWIN CHARGAFF, Professor of Biochemistry: 
DNA spelled backwards is 'und"; center: KARL MEYER, 
Professor of Biochemistry: intertzellular tzement tzubstance 
with chondroitin tzulfate tzee. 










■ 





Above left: PARITHYCHERY SRINIVA- 

SAN, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry: 
Have you tried our rat liver curry? center: 
BARBARA W. LOW, Associate Professor of 
Biochemistry: Halpha 'elix; right: STEPHEN 
ZAMENHOF. Associate Professor of Bio- 
chemistry: DNA can do wonders for you, too. 
Left: DAVID SPRINSON, Professor of Bio- 
chemistry: My lectures were as clear as these 
pictures. 



Below left: ZACHARIAS DISCHE. Professor 
of Biochemistry: Rhodopsin, my foot; all 
you need is a good pair of glasses. Below: 
GEORGE L. SAIGER, Associate Professor of 
Epidemiology: Fashions for the first fall — 
z-hat and skirt volume. 





47 





Above: HARRY M. ROSE. John E. Borne Professor of Micro- 
biology: Let me cover just a few points that you may have 
missed. Below. COUNCILMAN MORGAN, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Microbiology: Hmmm, a piece of my Volkswagen. 



Above: ELVIN A. KABAT, Professor of Microbiology: Let 
me introduce myself. Below: CALDERON HOWE, Associate 
Professor of Microbiology: You can't be Reiter than with a 
titer. 




48 




^ ,1 





Above left: SAM M. BEISER, Associate Professor of Micro- 
biology: My psvchiatrist tells me I have a complement 
fixation. Center: BEATRICE C. SEEGAL, Professor of Micro- 
biology: And then I killed him. Right: STUART W. 
TANENBAUM, Associate Professor of Microbiology: I was 
doing well until he said 'Let me cover just a few points that 
you mav have missed.' 



Below left: GABRIEL C. GODMAX. Associate Professor of 
Microbiology: Smile and the whole world smiles with you: 
and SOLON A. ELLISON, Assistant Professor of Microbiol- 
ogy: Columbus' gift to the new world— the Nina, the Pinta, 
and the Yaws. Below: HAROLD W. BROWN, Professor of 
Parasitology: No, it is not called the gefilte-fish worm. 







Opposite-Left: DONALD G. McKAY, Francis Delafield 
Professor of Pathology: In Boston, we didn't use smudge 
sticks: center: DAVID W. BEXXINGHOFF, Assistant 
Professor of Pathology: I know how Molotov teels; and 
right: DAVID SPIRO, Associate Professor of Pathology: 
jO million electrons can't be wrong. 



Below: Dr. Brown and students; Xow, the chief's daughter 
said it was one of you. 



Left: KATHLEEN L. HUSSEY, Associate Professor of 
Parasitology: Where's the scotch tape? Below left: ROGER 
W. WILLIAMS. Associate Professor of Medical Entomol- 
ogy: Euck! A cockroach. Below: LEOXARD J. GOLD- 
WATER, Professor of Occupational Medicine: I asked 
your opinion of my course, but there's no need to be 
abusive. 





50 






Below left: RAFFAELE LATTES, Professor of Surgical Pathology: So you're Elliot 
Ness. Below right: VIRGINIA KXEELAND FRANTZ, Professor of Surgery: Good 
Lord, it's a copy of Frarttz and Harvey written on the head of a pin ... with 
no errors. 



Vi 



8 






Left: LUCIANO OZZELLO, Assistant Professor of Surgical 
Pathology: Call me Lucky. Below: NATHAN LANE, Associ- 
ate Professor of Surgical Pathology: 22,496 cigarettes and 
you're mine. 





(continued from page 45) 

and limitations. Above all, the purpose is 
to establish confidence in his power to ob- 
serve and to reason correctly from his ob- 
servations. This can only be done by prac- 
ticing the experimental method; it cannot 
be taken ever ready-made from the text- 
books . . . 

Compared with the average college 
course, the medical curriculum makes heavy 
demands upon the student's capacity to learn. 
How to help him make the fullest use of 
his mental endowments is the problem of 
the preclinical departments. The order and 
arrangement of courses, starting with the 
study of structure (gross, miscroscopic, and 
neuroanatomy) , followed by the study of 
function (physiology and biochemistry) is 
designed to [increase] the student's [aware- 
ness, to enable him] not only to know but 
to understand. 

Magnus I. Gi-egersen, Science, 91:305-30S 



Above: HARRY B. VAN DYKE, David Hosack Professor 
of Pharmacology: Harumph; if you bring me my micro- 
phone, I'll answer your question. 




52 





Left: SHIH-CHUN WANG, Professor 
of Pharmacology: This pussy cat, not 
tiger. 







Left: FREDERICK G. HOFMANN, Associate Professor of 
Pharmacology: Benactyzinc. 



Uelow left: HERBERT J. BARTELSTONE, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Pharmacology: Well, yesh, alcohol is uniformly 
depreshing; and WILBUR H. SAWYER, Associate Professor 
of Pharmacology: There are various ways of increasing GFR— 
turn on the faucet, put his hand in warm water, or play 
Handel. Below: GABRIEL G. NAHAS, Associate Professor 
of Anesthesiology, and assistants performing apnea experi- 
ment; and JOE. 







53 



IN the practice of medicine, the physician employs a discipline which seeks to utilize scien- 
tific methods and principles in the solution of its problems, but it is one which in the end, re- 
mains an art. It is an art in . . . that it is impossible to exclude judgment and experience from 
the interpretation of the patient's reactions. It is an art in [that the physician] cannot proceed 
in his labors with the cool detachment of the scientist . . . who theoretically is disinterested in 
the practical outcome of his work. The physician must never forget that his primary and tra- 
ditional objectives are utilitarian— the prevention and cure of disease and the relief of suffering, 
whether of body or mind . . . The art of medicine lies in establishing all the diagnoses in each 
case, and in instituting the most effective management. 



The Approach to the Patient, in Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, Second edition, 1956. 




Right: STANLEY E. BRADLEY, Samuel Bard Pro- 
fessor of Medicine: Stop kissing my feet and con- 
tinue the presentation. 






54 




Above: DANA W. ATCHLEY, Professor Emeritus of Clinical Medicine, 
and GEORGE W. MELCHER. Assistant Professor of Clinical Medi- 
cine: Tweedledee and Tweedledum. Right: This is the first Group 
Clinic visit ... of this 52 year old white female . . . crock? . . . 
"What exactly is a crock? 





Left: HAMILTON SOUTHWORTH, Clini- 
cal Professor of Medicine: Pandora's box. Be- 
low left: YALE KNEELAND, JR., Professor 
of Medicine: Ubi fever, ibi pus. Below right: 
DAVID SEEGAL, Professor of Medicine: Ic 
ne wat. 



jgrL-\^i*i< 




55 





» ' 



Above left: ALFRED P. FTSHMAN, Associate Professor of Medicine, 
and HOWARD G. BRUENN, Assistant Clinical Professor of Medi- 
cine: Your chief complaint is that you want to know your pulmonary 
wedge pressure?? Above right: STUART W. COSGRIFF. Assistant 
Professor of Clinical Medicine: Your twenty-sixth rewrite wasn't so 
bad, but you left out 'no pemphigus.' 



j - w - 




Above: DAVID SCHACHTER, Assistant Professor of 
Medicine: With all that calcium, sir, doesn't he get 
constipated? Right: DONALD F. TAPLEY, Assistant 
Professor of Medicine: She sure SPILLED sugar that 
time. 




Below: GEORGE A. PERERA, Assistant Dean and Professor of Medicine: I'll be glad to answer 
all questions ... I can tell you there are at least four possibilities here ... But let's not confuse 
the truth with the right answer. 




56 




Above: GROUP CLINIC STAFF. Left: MRS. TOWNSEND: You did what without your attending? Center MISS LIGHTNER: 
Of course we phony 'em up, what do you think? Right: MRS. RAY: Disposition— return 6 years? 




i 



Above: DANIEL L. LARSON, Assistant Clinical Professor 
of Medicine, and clinicopathologic case discusser: This was 
the case l.here 'LE prep till positive' was the right order. 
Right: ROBERT C. DARLING. Simon Baruch Professor 
of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation: Nope, it's not like 
chiropractic. Below left: NICHOLAS P. CHRISTY, Assistant 
Professor of Medicine: Dr. Zorba said he'd meet me here. 
Below right: ALBERT R. LAMB, JR., Associate Professor 
of Clinical Medicine: If you don't like 844's, take 835's. 









57 







Above: ELLIOT F. OSSERMAN, Assistant Professor 
of Medicine: I'm a fruit and nut man, myself. 



Above: ALFRED GELLHORN, Pro- 
fessor of Medicine, Francis Delafield 
Hospital: I'm a medicine man, not 
a cigarette man. Left: THEODORE 
B. VAN ITALLIE, Associate Clinical 
Professor of Medicine,! St. Luke's 
Hospital: Then I take one egg and 
30 cc of heavy cream and esterify it 
with a jigger of gin. Right: JOHN 
E. ULTMANN, Associate in Medi- 
cine: There's going to be a big blast 
at Delafield tonight. 




Left: FREDERICK R. BAILEY, Cli- 
nical Professor of Medicine: In a re- 
cent article by Ringling, Ringling, 
Barnum, et al . . . Right: ARTHUR 
R. WERTHEIM. Associate Professor 
of Medicine, Gold water Memorial 
Hospital: If the bridge goes . . , 




Left: JOHN H. LARAGH, Associate 
Professor of Clinical Medicine: The 
rubber tubing and earpieces are 
sewn into my coat pocket. 




58 




Left: KERMI I~ L. PINES, Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine: If you will per- 
mit me to become emotional . . . Below: ALBERT W. GROKOEST, Assistant Clin- 
ical Professor of Medicine: Think of the lesion. 



Below: JOHN V. TACGART, Professor of 
Medicine: It hoits me here, doc! 







Left: CHARLES A. FLOOD, Associate 
Professor of Clinical Medicine: It's 
only my third hematemesis. 



Left: CHARLES RAGAN, Samuel W. 
Lambert Professor of Medicine, Bel- 
levue Hospital: What do you mean 
you can't hear me, I'm practically 
shouting. Right: CHARLES L. CHRIS- 
TIAN, Assistant Professor of Medicine: 
And after this, 8 West wants a Stat 
VCT. 




59 






Above—left: M. IRENE FERRER, Associate Professor of Clinical 
Medicine: Mind your p's and q's; center: REJANE HARVEY, As- 
sociate Professor of Clinical Medicine: Left anterior oblique; and, 
right: DICKINSON W. RICHARDS, Special Lecturer and former 
Lambert Professor of Medicine: Although we turned up the Bird, 
he gave up the ghost. Below left: ANDRE F. COURNAND, West- 
chester Heart Association Professor of Cardiovascular Research: 
This poor man— wc can do absolutely nothing for him, except 
study him. 






Above: SIDNEY C. WERNER, As- 
sociate Professor of Clinical Medi- 
cine: There's a Playboy in here some- 
where. Left: HENRY ARANOW, As- 
sociate Professor of Clinical Medicine: 
I'd like to continue talking, but I 
have a lump in my throat. Below— 
left: GERARD M. TURINO, As- 
sociate Professor of Medicine: Cyano- 
tic means goodbve in any language; 
center: PUTNAM C. LLOYD, As- 
sociate Clinical Professor of Medicine: 
Good grief, the Berrv plan finally 
caught up with me; and, right: 
HELEN M. ANDERSON. Associate 
in Medicine: The machine's broken— 
we'll have to do it bv taste. 






60 




Left: EDWARD C. CURNEN. Reuben S. 
Carpemier Professor of Pediatrics: I ab a 
code id bv dose, bobalv a viwus. Below: 
RUSTIN McINTOSH, Professor Emeritus 
of Pediatrics: I'm getting rusty now that 
I've retired. 





Above: HATTIE E. ALEXAN- 
DER, Professor of Pediatrics: 
I don't care if I did speak for 
18 minutes, you still have 2 
minutes left to present. Left: 
RUTH C. HARRIS, Assistant 
Professor of Pediatrics: Then, 
although I do not smoke, I lost 
my taste for cigarettes. 




V o field of specialized medicine has a broad- 
m er scope, greater responsibilities or greater 
11 possibilities than has pediatrics. One im- 
portant fact sets it apart from other divisions 
of medicine: it is chiefly concerned with the 
continued growth and development of its 
subjects. The goal in the medical manage- 
ment of the child is to permit him to come in- 
to adulthood at his optimal state of develop- 
ment, physically, mentally, and socially, so 
that he can compete at his most effective level. 



The physician who cares for children must 
of course be familiar with the illnesses and 
psychologic disturbances peculiar to infants 
and children and their reactions to them. But 
he must also know what constitutes adequate 
achievement at successive age levels for child- 
ren of different body types and capabilities 
. . . This, the individualization of the child, 
is the essence of pediatric practice. 

Waldo E. Nelson. M. D., in An Introduction to the 

Medical Problems of Infants and Children, 

in Textbook of Pediatrics, Seventh edition, 1959. 



61 




Left: HERBERT I. COHEN, Instruc- 
tor in Pediatrics: I work and I slave, 
but I don't sweat. Right: JAMES A. 
WOLFF, Associate Professor of Clini- 
cal Pediatrics: I'll huff and I'll puff, 
and I'll blow your house down. 





Left: MELVIN M. GRUMBACH, Associate Professor of Ped- 
iatrics; JACK ROSMAITA, Assistant Resident; and SELNA L. 
KAPLAN, Instructor in Pediatrics: And after all that, it 
turned out just to be a fat kid. Below: WILLIAM A. SILVER- 
MAN, Associate Professor of Pediatrics: No job is too 
small for me. 






Above left: DAVID H. BAKER, As- 
sistant Professor of Radiology: The 
crew cut skull may also be a normal 
variant. Left: WILLIAM A. BLANC, 
Associate Professor of Pathology: Who 
but the Swiss could have invented Ov- 
altine. Right: DOROTHY H.ANDER- 
SEN, Professor of Pathology: And they 
were big and bulky, and phew! 




62 




Left: SYLVIA P. GRIF- 
FITHS, Assistant Professor of 
Pediatrics; In regards to . . . 
Right: CHARLES L.WOOD. 
Associate Clinical Professor of 
Pediatrics: And for retro- 
pharyngeal abscesses, they 
keep this one fingernail long 
and sharp. 






Above left: {CATHERINE SPRUNT, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics: Pardon me, 
I have a tummv ache. Above right: JOHN' M. BRUSH, Assistant Clinical Pro- 
fessor of Pediatrics: Forgive me if I shock you. Right: DOUGLAS S. DAMROSCH, 
Assistant Professor of Pediatrics: It pays to be a full-timer. 

Below-left: ANNELIESE L. SITARZ, Associate in Pediatrics: Anneliese Bell by 
Edgar Allan Sitarz; center: WILLIAM A. BAUMAN, Assistant Clinical Professor 
of Pediatrics: Kid, if you throw one more spitball . . .; and, right: SIDNEY 
BLUMENTHAL, Professor of Clinical Pediatrics: No, I'm not the Fabric Man. 






7 



"It;- 
} i 




» 



I 



63 




Left: H. HOUSTON MERRITT, 
Dean, and Professor o£ Neurology: 
You must use yo' haid and yo' nu-o- 
logical hammah. Right: J. LAW- 
RENCE POOL, Professor of Neuro- 
logical Surgery: Blood, sweat and J. 
Lawrence. 




o, 



"f all the branches of medicine, clinical 
neurology lends itself best to the [correlation] 
of signs and symptoms [with] diseased struc- 
ture and function . . . To arrive at a correct 
diagnosis of a neurological condition a sys- 
tematic examination is essential . . . One 
must be able to evaluate properly the signs 
and symptoms which are elicited, [for] unless 
each is properly understood, the facts accum- 
ulated during an examination become a 
meaningless jumble [of] eponymic signs and 
syndromes — a thorough knowledge of anat- 
omy and physiology of the nervous system is 
necessary. If all the facts point to the pres- 
ence of a lesion in the nervous system, the 
next step is to localize it. A focal diagnosis is 
necessary before determining the probable 
nature of the lesion [which is] finally deter- 
mined by proper evaluation of the history, 
the onset, course and development of the ill- 
ness, and by sound knowledge of pathology. 

Israel S. Wechsler, M. D., in Preface and Introduction to 
Textbook of Ciinical Neurology, Eighth edition, 1958. 



Right: CARMINE T. 
VICALE, Professor of 
Clinical Neurology: For 
people who can't brush 
their teeth after every 
meal . . . 





Above: ABNER WOLF, Profes- 
sor of Neuropathology: Now this 
will . . . tap, tap . . . become 
clear . . . tap, tap ... in the 
next 44 . . . tap, tap . . . slides. 




64 





4 -m • 
9, i 



f 



. \ 



Left: WILLIAM AMOLS, Assistant 
Professor of Clinical Neurology: I 
come here to praise seizures, not bury 
them. Right: ELI S. GOLDENSOHN. 
Assistant Professor of Neurology: It's 
only an ectopic focus. 





Left: PAUL F. A. HOEFER, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Neurology: It was predominantly 
33 and 1/3 with some 45. Above: SIDNEY 
CARTER, Professor of Clinical Neurology: 
And they stimulate the flow of liver bile to 
the stomach. 



Right: ROBERT A. FISHMAN, Assistant 
Professor of Neurology: Why am I standing 
down here? Left: DANIEL SCIARRA, Asso- 
ciate Professor of Neurology: Watch your 
left hand, buddy! Below: LEWIS P. ROW- 
LAND, Assistant Professor of Neurology: I 
feel great and Tensilon doesn't upset my 
stomach. 





65 



Right: LAWRENCE C. KOLB, Professor of 
Psychiatry: Who knows what evil lurks in 
the hearts of men. Belozc: WILLIAM A. 
HORWITZ. Professor of Clinical Psychiatry: 
Hello, Con Edison, we need more current. 



mm 4 


i 


Jd 


i&s 


j 1 * 


7k 


i n. 




-Tsychiatry may be defined as that branch 
of medicine which deals with the genesis, 
dynamics, manifestations and treatment of 
such disordered and undesirable function- 
ings as disturb either the subjective life of 
the individual or his relations with other per- 
sons or with society. . . . Psychiatry is con- 
cerned not merely with the clinical manifes- 
tations and treatment of disturbances of hu- 
man thinking, feeling and behavior but also 
with the energizing factors and influences 
that determine behavior. Particularly is psy- 
chiatry concerned with the morbid person- 
ality and with psvchopatholoev . . . the imma- 
turities, disorganizations and disintegrations 
of personality. 

Noyes and Kolb. in Modern Clinical Psychiatry, 
Fifth edition, 1958. 





Above right: HILDE BRUCH 
Clinical Professor of Psychiatry 
Ooom bov, are vou fat! Left 
H. DONALD DUNTON, Assist 
ant Professor of Psychiatry 
Don't play with it, flush it 
Right: PHILIP POLATIN, Pro 
fessor of Clinical Psychiatry 
Shh, they're saying something 
now. 




66 





Fur left: SIDNEY MALITZ, Assistant 
Clinical Professor of Psychiatry: Now, 
docs everything look purple. Left: 
DONALD S. KORNFIELD. Instructor 
in Psychiatry: It's a good TV show, 
but we don't have a sponsor. 



Below: WILLIAM S. LANGFORD, 
Professor of Psychiatry: But most of 
all, I remember Mama. 




Above: ISRAEL KESSELI3RENNER, Assistant Clinical Professor of Psy- 
chiatry: What do you mean, I don't own the island? Below left: ROGER 
MacKINNON, Clinical Professor of Psychiatry: You've never met me, but 
you've seen my circulars. Below right: SHERVERT H. FRAZIER, Assist- 
ant Professor of Psychiatry: Ah lak' thuh wahde open spayces. 






67 



Right: GEORGE H. HUMPREYS II, Valentine 
Mott Professor of Surgery: What do you mean 
a wound infection; my grandfather never washed 
his hands either. Below: PHILIP D. WIEDEL, 
Assistant Professor of Clinical Surgery: Sorry I 
can't hear you, Virginia, I have c-s-f leaking 
from my ear. 






Left: HAROLD G. BARKER, Associate Professor of Clinical 
Surgery: And when I turned the lights back on, Virginia, there 
was no one there. Below left: ROBERT H. E. ELLIOT, JR., 
Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery: If worse comes to worse, 
we can do it on Sunday in the treatment room. Below right: 
RICHMOND L. MOORE, Associate Professor of Clinical Sur- 
gery: No you can't— I'm doing a shunt in there on Sunday. 



i r* 




|l»"yl|j| 

4k 1 



Left: CARL R. FEIN'D, Instructor in 
Surgery: We'll take it off right here— lie 
down on the desk. 




68 




Left: ARTHUR H. BJLAKEMORE, 

Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery; 
But with my tube, when you suck 
back it comes back chocolate-flavored. 
Below left: HAROLD D. HARVEY, 
Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery: 
The pen is mightier than the sword. 





Above: CUSHMAN I). HAAGENSEN, Pro- 
fessor of Clinical Surgery: Hey diddle diddle, 
there's milk in its middle. Above left: LAW- 
RENCE W. SLOAN, Professor of Clinical 
Surgery: No, I'm not in the supermarket 
business. Below: The OR: Very funny, very 
funny— now turn the patient over. 




69 




Surgery has been defined 'as that branch 
of Medical Science which treats of mechan- 
ical or operative measures for healing dis- 
eases, deformities and injuries'; that is, sur- 
gery is a branch of medical science. It has 
to do with therapy carried out by the hands; 
its purpose is to heal ... It is important to 
appreciate that surgery has been, and still is, 
a more definite form of therapy than medi- 
cine, and that results, good or bad, are more 
convincing. 

Allen O. Whipple, M.D., in Christopher's 
Textbook of Surgery, Seventh edition, 1960. 




Below: DAVID V. HABIF, Associate Professor of Clinical 
Surgery: I got my job through the New York Times. 




Above left: RUDOLF N. SCHULLINGER, 
Professor of Clinical Surgery: Do as I say, 
not as I do, my son. Left: GEORGE F. 
CRIKELAIR, Professor of Clinical Surgery: 
I'm sorry, Mr. Durante ... Below: JOSE M. 
FERRER, Associate Clinical Professor of 
Surgery: No, I did not play Cyrano de Ber- 
gerac. 




Right: JOHN PRUDDEN, 
Instructor in Surgery: All 
right, I took the cookies. 




70 



V 




Above left: GRANT SANGER, Assistant Professor of Clinical 
Surgery: Gently. Cushman, gently. Above right: MILTON 
R. PORTER, Associate Professor of Clinical Surgery: Uncle 
Miltie. Far right: CYRIL SANGER, Assistant Professor of 
Anesthesiology: In the September issue of Punch . . . 





Left: ROBERT B. HIATT, As- 
sociate Professor of Clinical Sur- 
gery: So that's why we're moving 
vou from out in the hall into 
the office. Right: EMANUEL 
M. PAPPER, Professor of Anes- 
thesiology: Who turned on the 
nitrous oxide? 







Left: EDMUND N. GOOD- 
MAN. Assistant Clinical Pro- 
fessor of Surgery: Just use 
Your noodles. Right: HER- 
BERT RACKOW. Assistant 
Professor of Anesthesiology: 
Schlaft gesunt, boobie. 




71 





Above: ARTHUR B. VOORHEES, In- 
structor in Surgery: We're starting a 
new club — 'Alcoholics Anomalous.' 
Below: JAMES R. MALM, Assistant 
Professor of Surgery: No, it doesn't 
beat; you've got to pump it! 






Left: THOMAS V. SANTULLI, Asso- 
ciate Professor of Clinical Surgery: Its 
barf is worse than its bite. Right: 
SHIVAJI B. BHONSLAY, Instructor 
in Surgery: Baba, the bongo banger. 



Above: HUGH AUCHINCLOSS, 
JR., Assistant Clinical Professor 
of Surgery: Yes, you'll have a 
scar, but it won't show— unless 
you go out. Left: FERDINAND 
F. MCALLISTER, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Clinical Surgery: As 
part of the fourth year teaching 
program I take two sugars and 
no cream. 




72 



Right: FRANK E. STINCHFIELD. Professor of Or- 
thopedic Surgery: I wish I will, I wish I might; I wish 
the fragments come out right. Below: HARRISON L. 
McLAUGHLIN, Professor of Clinical Orthopedic Sur- 
gery: Solid as a church, loose as a goose, and virgin's . . . 




) 










rthoi'edics is concerned with the study of 
the form and function of the human frame; 
its attack is directed against those affectations 
that deform the architecture or arrest the 
balanced mechanisms of man's body, and in- 
juries of the bones, muscles, nerves and soft 
structures which result in loss of form and 
function are thus its legitimate objective . . . 
The solution of the problems of an ortho- 
pedic case depends on a clear understanding 
of the pathological nature of each lesion, and 
success in treatment on a scrupulous atten- 
tion to minute detail. Orthopedic work is 
thus exacting. 

Sir Waller Mercer, in 
Orthopaedic Surgery, Fifth edition. 1959. 



Right: FREDERICK S. CRAIG, Asso- 
ciate Professor of Clinical Orthopedic 
Surgery: Please press up, my arm's 
caught in the elevator. 




Left: ALEXANDER GARCIA, Assist- 
ant Professor of Clinical Orthopedic 
Surgery: Speaking of fractures, let's 
take a coffee break. Right: SAWNIE 
R. GASTON, Assistant Professor of 
Clinical Orthopedic Surgery: And 
this amazing machine also cuts cheese, 
shreds cabbage, and dices cucumber. 




IF 



73 




Right: CHARLES S. NEER II, Assist- 
tant Professor of Clinical Orthopedic 
Surgery: Dear Chubby Checker— thank 
you for all the business you've been 
sending us. Below: The Orthopedic 
Surgery third-year final examination: 
What do you mean you have a note 
from your mother excusing you? 



Left: CHARLES A. L. BASSETT, As- 
sociate Professor of Orthopedic Sur- 
gery: Dem bones, dem bones, dem 
dry bones. Right: ' LEONIDAS A. 
LANTZOUNIS, Clinical Professor of 
Orthopedic Surgery: Hey, look at dees, 
dey spelled 'feets' wrong. 








Above rigid: MELVIN B. WATklNS. 

Associate Clinical Professor of Ortho- 
pedic Surgery: No, the veterinarians do 
not set Colles' fractures. Left: HAL- 
FORD HALLOCK, Professor of Clin- 
ical Orthopedic Surgery: It's orthopod. 
not arthropod. Right: BARBARA B. 
STIMSON, Assistant Clinical Professor 
of Orthopedic Surgery: So then I gave 
him a half nelson . . . 




74 





Left: HOWARD C. TAYLOR. Profes- 
sor of Obstetrics and Gynecology: If 
it's not in the pelvis, we're not inter- 
ested. Right: STANLEY M. BYSSHE. 
Associate Professor of Obstetrics and 
Gynecology: My first name is not 
Pern-. 







k 




Left: ALVIN J. B. TILLMAN. Assist- 
ant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics 
and Gynecology: Milk of magnesia? I 
said magnesium sulfate. Below: 
Another interesting Sloane Hospital 
conference: we are undertaking clinical 
trials of the Hoover remover man- 
euver. 





1 



Above left: D. ANTHONY D'ESOPO. 
Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and 
Gynecology: ROP. Left: PAUL 
O'CONNELL, Assistant Professor of 
Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology: 
Grogan, what else lies in the murky 
depths of your mind? Right: SAUL 
B. GUSBERG, Associate Professor of 
Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology: 
No fair, you punch below the belt. 




75 




V 



' 



'^1^ 






Above: EQUINN W. MUNNELL, As- 
sociate Clinical Professor of Obstetrics 
and Gynecology: This is not a non- 
neoplastic neoplasm. Left: ROBERT 
E, HALL, Assistant Clinical Professor 
of Obstetrics and Gynecology: Yes 
ma'am, we'll save yo' natuh. 




Below: EMANUEL A. FRIEDMAN, 

Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and 
Gynecology: And for my next lecture, 
I'd like to read . . . 





Above: CHARLES M. STEER, Associ- 
ate Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and 
Gynecology: I don't know— the rubber 
head always makes it. 



Above: W. DUANE TODD, Instructor 
in Obstetrics and Gynecology: A mid- 
wife's work is never done. Ri^lit: 
WILLIAM V. CAVANAUGH, Associ- 
ate Clinical Professor of Obstetrics and 
Gynecology: And there goes another 
satisfied customer. 

76 




o 



bstetrics and gynecology are generally 
regarded as constituting one broad specialty. 
Gynecology has to do with the physiology 
and pathology of the female reproductive or- 
gans in the non-pregnant state, whereas the 
distinguishing feature of obstetrics is that it 
deals with the pregnant state and its sequels. 
. . . Disorders in either field frequently simu- 
late those in the other, and correct differen- 
tial diagnosis entails an intimate acquaintance 
with the clinical syndromes met in both; in 
addition, the methods of examination and 
many operative technics are common to both 
disciplines. 

Nicholson J. Eastman, in 
Williams' Obstetrics, Eleventh edition, 1956. 





Right: SEYMOUR LIEBER- 
MAN, Associate Professor of 
Biochemistry: I refuthe to pay 
for the projection thcreen. 




Above right: VINCENT J. FREDA, 
Associate in Obstetrics and Gynecol- 
ogy: You see, your honor, the baby's 
blood type is and mine is AB . . . 
Right: GILBERT J. VOSBURGH, 
Associate Professor of Clinical Obste- 
trics and Gynecology: I have S6; do I 
hear S6.50? Left: HAROLD M. M. 
TOVELL, Assistant Clinical Professor 
of Obstetrics and Gynecology: Bot- 
toms up. 







Above: LANDRUM B. SHETTLES, Assist- 
ant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gyn- 
ecology: I can identify them, but I can't stop 
them. Far left: ANNA L. SOUTHAM, Asso- 
ciate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology: 
Is it 'inconceivable', 'impregnable,' or 'un- 
bearable'? Left: RAYMOND L. Vande- 
WIELE, Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and 
Gynecology: Vun hundret milligramz de- 
hydro-izo-cpi-androzterone all for myzelf? 



77 






Above Left: WILLIAM B. SEAMAN, Professor of Radiology: 
I'm thinking of making 'Inside U.S.A.' in wide-screen cinera- 
diography; center: RALPH SCHLAEGER, Assistant Professor 
of Radiology: Well, just try and hold it for one more minute; 
ar.d right: KENT ELLIS, Assistant Professor of Radiology: 
We've looked at your x-rays from student health and we'd 
like some tomograms. 




Above: JOHN K. LAT- 
TIMER, Professor of 
LTrology: And this suit 
cost S200. Right: HANS 
H. ZINSSER, Associate 
Professor of Clinical Urol- 
ogy: And this one cost 
528.5(1. 




The radiologic point of view in medical 
diagnosis embodies appreciation of the prin- 
ciple that the tissues and organs which com- 
prise the human body can be investigated in 
situ [thus allowing an] exhilarating collateral 
channel of approach to the complex riddles 
of medicine. 

Hodges, Lampe, and Holt, in Introduction 
to Radiology for Medical Students, Third edition, 1961. 

The practice of urology is more than the per- 
formance of surgical procedures upon those 
organs making up the urinary tract and the 
male genital tract. [It] involves a wide 
knowledge . . . basic to the selection and per- 
formance of the correct therapeutic [uro- 
logic] procedure at the correct time. 

Flocks and Culp, in Surgical Urology, 
Second edition, 1961. 

The physician possessed of reasonable famil- 
iarity with the dozen or so chief patterns of 
disease will be able to classify over 90% of all 
dermatologic patients diagnostically and to 
treat them effectively . . . Many diseases of the 
skin may be diagnosed with accuracy on in- 
spection [initially]. Others are more obscure 
and difficult and require further study. 

Pillsbury, Shelley, and Kligman, in Preface 
to Dermatology. First edition, 1957. 

Ophthalmology is a branch of general medi- 
cine and surgery . . . Examination of the eye 
does not merely mean the investigation of an 
isolated organ, but the examination of the 
patient with special reference to that organ 
and its functions. 

Charles A. Percra. in Mav's Diseases of the Eye, 
Twenty-second edition, 1957. 

Otolaryngology ... is a specialty owing to 
the peculiar configuration and particular 
structures of the ears, nose, throat, and lar- 
ynx and the need for familiarity with the 
manifestations of disease in or about these 
parts of the body and the refined methods of 
their treatment. 

Abraham R. Hollender, in Office Treatment of the 
78 Nose, Throat and Ear. Second edition, 1946. 







Above left: ANTHONY N. DOMONK.OS, Assistant 
Clinical Professor of Dermatology: And then, when the 
sun comes through the window . . . Above right: 
CARL T. NELSON, Professor of Dermatology: " Of 
course it itches. Left: J. T. MCCARTHY, Instructor 
in Dermatology: Macule, papule— it's a pimple. Right: 
LUDWIG SCHVVEICH. Special Lecturer in Dermatol- 
ogy: Do you know vat it vas dot you just touched? 




¥ Li 



Left: MEYER H. SLATKIN, Assist- 
ant Professor of Dermatology: It looks 
like psoriasis, has the same distribu- 
tion as psoriasis, but in this case, it's 
lichen planus. Above right: J. LOWRY 
MILLER, Associate Clinical Professor 
of Dermatology: If it's dry, wet it— 
if it's wet, dry it— but keep it away 
from me. Right: F. PHILIP LOWEN- 
FISH, Assistant Clinical Professor of 
Dermatology: Have gumma, will tra- 
vel-T. Pallidum. 




* 



/? A 



79 





t 



f 




Above— left: ROBERT M. DAY, Assistant Professor of Clinical Ophthalmology; center: 
GEORGE R. MERRIAM, JR., Assistant Professor of Clinical Ophthalmology; and, 
right: ROBERT M. ELLSWORTH, Instructor in Ophthalmology: The most important 
principle in ophthalmology is to wait until the patient can see perfectly and then 
present him with your bill. Left: CHARLES A. PERERA, Associate Clinical Professor 
of Ophthalmology: May I? 



Right: STUART WHITFIELD, 

Instructor in Otolaryngology: Hoot 
mon, it's a wee bit clouded. 






Above: EDMUND P. FOWLER, JR., Pro- 
fessor of Otolaryngology: Fowler's posi- 
tion. Above right: JULES WALTNER. 
Associate Professor of Clinical Otolaryn- 
gology: So I said to Zsa Zsa, we could 
make beautiful noses together. Right: 
MILOS BASEK, Assistant Professor of 
Clinical Otolaryngology: What do you 
mean the test was written in an accent? 




Above: ROBERT M. HUT, As- 
sistant Clinical Professor of 
Otolaryngology: Has anyone seen 
Dewev or Louie? Below: E. B. 
BILCHICK, Associate in Otol- 
aryngology: You say it's a tu- 
mor— I say he picks his nose. 




80 



Advertisements 



Memorabilia 



Miscellany 



81 






Dedicated to the 
discovery and development 
of better medicines 
for better health- 
si nee 1841. 




£ 



ty» 



82 



Class Poll 

81 of 117 students responding 
Intended field of specialization: 



Medicine 


30% 


Pediatrics 5% 


Surgery 
Psychiatry 
Orthopedics 
Undecided 


16% 
8% 
5% 

20% 


Obstetrics-Gyn. 4% 
Pathology 4% 
Neurology 2% 
Others 6% 


Favorite course 
Microbiology 
Pharmacology 
Physical diagn> 


during 
osis 


pre-clinical years: 



Favorite instructor during pre-clinical years: 
Harry Rose 
Harold Brown 

Favorite course during clinical years: 
Medicine: third year clerkship and fourth 

year sub-internship 
Pediatrics: third year clerkship 
Surgery: fourth year sub-internship 

Favorite instructor during clinical years: 
Yale Kneeland 

David Seegal and Arthur Wertheim 
Donald Tapley 




Above: 'Medical Education— The Bedside Lecture': A eu- 
phemism by any other name is still the same. 




Marital and family status: 

Married 50% 

Of these, without children 65% 

With one child 30% 

With two children 5% 

including 1 1 boys 

and 5 girls 



Employed during medical school: 52% 



Above: "Research Heroic— The Self Inoculation': The old 
dope peddler. Below: 'The Doctor'— The Obstetrician: If 
Tretter comes in now, I'm through. 



Religious affiliation: 
Protestant 507c 

Jewish 35% 

Political affiliation: 
Republican 26% 
Democrat 16% 

No response 10% 



Catholic 
No response 



Liberal 
Independent 
John Birch 



5% 
10% 



9% 

38% 

1% 




83 



Perspective 

(Continued from page 39) 




"Pug) 



Above: The South Property: home of the medical rec- 
ords and other inconnabula — an artist's sketch. 



SELBY L. TURNER 

Life Membership in Leader's Association 

Specialist in 
INSURANCE FOR PROFESSIONAL MEN 



233 Broadway, New York 7, N.Y. 
BEekman 3-6620 



It is sobering to think that these first 
graduates knew nothing whatever of Jenner's 
technique of vaccination for smallpox which 
was first announced in 1798, or of the stetho- 
scope which Laennec created in 1816 and 
used to further his technique of physical diag- 
nosis of the lung. They were contemporaries 
of Lavoisier who was beheaded during the 
French Revolution because of his convic- 
tions, but they were not aware of the implica- 
tions of his proposition that respiration in- 
volves oxidation. Although ether had been 
discovered in 1540 by Valerius Cordus, they 
had no idea of its potential as an anesthetic 
agent, for it was not until 1842 in Jefferson, 
Georgia, that Dr. Crawford W. Long used 
sulfuric ether gas when he removed a small 
tumor from the neck of James Venable. (Our 
Harvard friends like to think that ether was 
first used in 1846 at the Massachusetts Gen- 
eral Hospital, the year before the founding of 
the American Medical Association, but this 
just isn't so.) 

There are many other discoveries which 
we think of as coming from the horse-and- 
buggy days which were completely unknown 
to them. It was not until one hundred years 
after their time that Pasteur carried on his 
bacteriological and immunological studies 
and refuted the doctrine of spontaneous gen- 
eration, and Lister by developing the theory 
and technique of asepsis became the "Father 
of Modern Surgery." It was not until 1879 
that Murrell introduced nitroglycerin for the 
treatment of angina pectoris, and three years 
later that Koch discovered the tubercle bacil- 
lus and soon published his famed Postulates 
which have become the pillars of bacteriol- 
ogy. Exactly one hundred and twenty-five 
years after Tucker received his M.D. degree, 
Wilhelm Conrad von Roentgen discovered 
x-rays; William Osier had just completed his 
famous Principles and Practice of Medicine 
(1892) which shifted the center of medical 
authority from Europe to the New World 
and influenced the Rockefellers to create the 
Foundation for Medical Research in 1901; 
and Sigmund Freud was formulating his con- 
cepts of personality from empirical data 
gathered at couch-side. 

From this point on, the medical discov- 
eries which form the basis for our outlook as 



the graduating Class of 1962 are so numerous 
as to defy summary. However, mention of a 
few of the laureates of the Nobel Prize in 
Physiology and Medicine which was estab- 
lished in 1901 will serve to remind us of the 
scope of our field and the reasons why special- 
ization has become a necessity. In 1901, the 
prize was awarded to Emil Behring for the 
development of the diphtheria and tetanus 
antitoxins; in 1902, to Sir Ronald Ross for 
work on the malaria parasite. In 1923, Bant- 
ing and Macleod received it for the isolation 
of insulin; in 1924, Einthoven for develop- 
ment of the electrocardiogram; in 1930, 
Landsteiner for the discovery of human 
blood groups; in 1932, Sherrington and 
Adrian for studies of the function of neurons; 
in 1933, Morgan for his studies of the func- 
tion of genes and chromosomes in the trans- 
mission of heredity; and in 1945, Fleming, 
Florey, and Chain for the discovery of peni- 
cillin. In 1953, it was given to Krebs and 
Lipmann for the discovery of the citric acid 
cycle; in 1954, to Enders, Robbins, and Wel- 
ler for the cultivation of poliomyelitis virus in 
tissue culture; and in 1956 to Forssmann, 
with Richards and Cournand of Columbia, 
for their studies in cardiac catheterization. 

Nobel prizes are certainly not a measure 
of the field of Medicine, but they give a hint 
of its scope today as compared to the time of 
Robert Tucker and Samuel Kissam. In many 
ways, the role of the doctor, too, has changed. 

But in certain fundamentals, it has not 
changed at all from their time two hundred 
years ago. The challenges of today are equal- 
ly vast. They had to face the horrors of pesti- 
lence and epidemic, but we must control the 
dangers of atomic radiation. They were faced 
primarily with infectious diseases in a young 
population, whereas we are faced with degen- 
erative diseases in older people. They tried 
to do their job with a grossly inadequate 
number of doctors; we also have this problem 
in the face of the world population explosion. 
They had to educate their patients to accept 
new medical knowledge; the task of teaching 
is ours also. 

But even more basic, the challenge for the 
doctor in human terms remains unchanged. 
He is dedicated to the alleviation and, if pos- 
sible, the elimination of human suffering 
caused by disease, both mental and physical, 
if such a distinction is valid as it may well not 
be. His is the role of authority through 



knowledge. His is the task of treating the 
whole person. His is the place of compassion 
and understanding. This sentiment was the 
basis for Samuel Bard's appeal, at the first 
commencement of the King's College Medi- 
cal School, for funds to build a public hospi- 
tal associated with the College. He said: "Let 
those who are at once the unhappy Victims, 
both of Poverty and Disease, claim your par- 
ticular Attention; I cannot represent to my- 
self a more real object of Charity, than a poor 
Man with perhaps a helpless Family, labour- 
ing under the complicated Miseries of Sick- 
ness and Penury. Paint to yourselves the 
agonizing feeling of a Parent, whilst labour- 
ing under some painful Disease, he beholds 
a helpless Offspring around his Bed, in want 
of the necessaries of Nature; imagine the Des- 
pair of an affectionate Wife, and a tender 
Mother, who can neither relieve the Pain 
and Anxiety of her Husband, nor supply the 
importunate cravings of her Children; and 
then deny them your Assistance if you 
can . . ." The Hippocratic Oath is still the 
same. 

The Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Cen- 
ter today, covering many acres, department- 
alized with hundreds of specialists in many 
fields, is a far cry from the little building 
two hundred years ago at Broadway and 
Pearl Street with its faculty of six good men 
and a graduating class of two. Robert Tucker 
and Samuel Kissam could not have realized 
at the time of their graduation most of what 
we now take for granted as basic medical 
knowledge. They could not even have 
guessed at most of the developments which 
would occur in the next two hundred years 
of medical history. The best they could do 
was to use the knowledge which they had to 
the best of their ability, and through hard 
work, intensive research, dedication, and 
once in a while through the gifts of insight 
and intuition, push back the boundaries of 
ignorance and indifference a little bit. 

In this lies the lesson for us — namely, 
that the best of our knowledge is but a spring- 
board for the development of further knowl- 
edge. We cannot know the future, but we 
can use what we do know with curiosity and 
compassion. We have been given a heritage 
which would have far surpassed their imagi- 
nation. It is up to us to use it. 

Donald C. Bell 



ROGER STUDIOS 

J^ortraiti of atJiitincti 



lion 



4143 Broadway 

New York 32, New York 

Phone: WA. 7-7894 



We keep negatives of your photographs on file 
for many years after graduation. 



86 





The hands of friendship 

build great institutions. 

Our best wishes to 

ourfriends at Columbia 

Chemical 
New\brk 



CHEMICAL BANK NEW YORK TRUST COMPANY 



87 




Best Wishes to THE CLASS OF 1962 

ORTHO PHARMACEUTICAL CORPORATION 

RARITAN, NEW JERSEY 



Compliments 
of 

CRUNE & STRATTON, INC 

Publishers of 
MEDICAL and SCIENTIFIC BOOKS 



WA. 3-9216-9217 

Luigi's Restaurant & Bar 

Washington Heights' Leading Italian Restaurant 
1 148 St. Nicholas Avenue 
Bet. 167th and 168th Sts. 



24-HOUR KODACHROME SERVICE 

MORRIS CAMERA SHOP 

3958 Broadway (166th St.) 

Opposite Medical Center 
Phone: LO. 8-8590 

Special Discount to Students 

SILVER PALM 
LUNCHEONETTE 

4001 Broadway, corner 168th St. 

JOHN W. BUN6ER 

GROCER 

FRUITS and VEGETABLES 

226 Ft. Washington Avenue 
Corner 169th Street 

WAdsworth 7-3233 

LARRY ORIN 

JEWELER 

Electronically Tested Watch Repairs 

4009 Broadway New York, 32 

Special Discounts for Hospital Personnel 



Kramer Surgical Stores, 
Kramer Scientific Corp. 



~4>- 



544 WEST 168TH STREET 



NEW YORK 32, N. Y. 




89 



Compliments 
of the 



P & s 



ALUMNI 



ASSOCIATION 



To each member of the Class of 1962 

THE P & S ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

extends its best wishes for 

a happy and successful career. 



90 



COMPLIMENTS 



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1202 St. Nicholas Avenue 

Bet. 170th and 171st Sts. 

New York 32, N. Y. 



WA. 3-2424 



Say if with Flowers' 



MEDICAL CENTER 
FLOWER SHOP 

CARDASIS, INC., FLORIST 

Artistic Decorations for All Occasions 
The Flower Shop Nearest Medical Center 

"WE TELEGRAPH FLOWERS" 

4003 Broadway at 168th Street 
New York 32, N. Y. 

Tel.: LO. 8-1230 Nick Tsakiridis 

OLYMPIC BARBER SHOP 

Bet. 169th and 170th Sts. 
4021 Broadway New York 32, N. Y. 

Compliments of 

CARVEL 

FEATURING 36 HOME-MADE ICE CREAMS 

1 154 St. Nicholas, opposite 
Medical Center 



Left: Presbyterian Hospital at Madison Avenue and Seven- 
tieth Street. 



Below: The Presbyterian Hospital ambulance. 




For Prompt Call and Delivery Service 
Coll WAshington Heights 7-3884 

D. APPEL 

EXPERT TAILOR, CLEANERS, and DYERS 

230 Ft. Washington Avenue 
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Hanover, New Jersey 



94 




Sjtecia.ti£t4. 6k t&e frxaelccctiaK 

<x£ £ckc annual £<*t dc6&old 

and callepet everywhere. 



Established 1919 



H. G. Roebuck & Son, Inc. 

PRINTERS • LITHOGRAPHERS 



2140 Aisquith Street 

Baltimore 18, Md. 

HOpkins 7-6700 



PROUD PRODUCERS OF YOUR ANNUAL 



95 



WAdsworrh 7-5700 



Lie. 532 



A/ CITARELLA, INC 

WINES AND LIQUORS 

Visit Our Wine Cellar 

3915 BROADWAY near 164TH STREET 
NEW YORK 32, N. Y. 





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"\iNV\*vDER.Bll.T CI.MC 
COLUXlBlA-PR£SISYTERjAN' "XlEDlC.-U- CSKTEB,, 

"Se\t "Yorj^. CITY. 



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"■>A,A^ 



THE MEDICAL CENTER BOOKSTORE 



Extends its Sincerest Good Wishes 



to 



THE CLASS OF 1962 



96 



TROPICAL 



GARDENS 



~4>°- 



ON BROADWAY between 



169TH and 170TH STREETS 



WAdsworth 3-8918 




TASTY DELICATESSEN 

FOR EXPERT CATERING 

Call WA. 3-0700 
4020 Broadway at 169th St. 

Uptown Wines & Liquor Store, Inc. 

4033 Broadway at 170th Street 

New York 32, N. Y. 

LO. 8-2100 

Courtesy Cards 

Medical Center Pharmacy 

JACOB KAPLAN, Ph.G. 

4013 Broadway bet. 168th and 169th Sts. 

WA. 3-1258 New York City 

Specialists in Prescription Compounding 



Heights Camera Center 

The Leading Brands in Photographic 
Equipment and Supplies 

AT SPECIAL PRICES 

Tfie Finest Quality in Photo Finishing 
Done on Premises 

1229 ST. NICHOLAS AVENUE 

bet. 171st and 172nd Sts. 

NEW YORK 32, N. Y. 

WA. 3-3698 



97 



Dr. Hattie E. Alexander 

Dr. Frederick R. Bailey 

Dr. Harold W. Brown 

Dr. Malcolm B.. Carpenter 

Dr. E. Gurney Clark 

Dr. W. M. Copenhaver 

Dr. Stuart W. Cosgriff 

Dr. George F. Crikelair 

Dr. Edward C. Curnen, Jr. 

Dr. Robert C. Darling 

Dr. Robert H. E. Elliott, Jr. 

Dr. Anthony D'Esopo 

Dr. A. Gerard DeVoe 

Dr. Carl R. Feind 

Dr. Thomas P. Fleming 

Dr. Virginia Kneeland Frantz 

Dr. Sawnie R. Gaston 

Dr. Leonard J. Goldwater 

Dr. Magnus I. Gregersen 

Dr. Albert W. Grokoest 

Dr. S. B. Gusberg 

Dr. David V. Habif 

Dr. Harold T. Harvey 

Dr. Robert B. Hiatt 

Dr. William A. Horwitz 

Dr. George H. Humphreys II 

Dr. Harold W. Jacox 

Dr. Yale Kneeland, Jr. 

Dr. Lawrence C. Kolb 



Dr. Donald S. Kornfeld 
Dr. John H. Laragh 
Dr. Raffaele Lattes 
Dr. John K. Lattimer 
Dr. Robert F. Loeb 
Dr. James R. Malm 
Dr. H. Houston Merritt 
Dr. Charles S. Neer II 
Dr. Elliott F. Osserman 
Dr. George A. Perera 
Dr. Phillip Polatin 
Dr. J. Lawrence Pool 
Dr. M. R. Porter 



Sponsors 



Dr. D. W. Richards 

Dr. Walter S. Root 

Dr. Harry M. Rose 

Dr. David Seegal 

Dr. Arthur J. Snyder 

Dr. Anna L. Southam 

Dr. Hamilton Southworth 

Dr. Howard C. Taylor 

Dr. Carmine T. Vicale 

Mr. Thomas E. Allen 

Mr. Newell A. Augur 

Dr. and Mrs. G. Barton Barlow 



Mr. and Mrs. Donald S. Bell 
Dr. H. Glenn Bell 
Dr. Harry L. Berman 
Mr. and Mrs. William Bezahler 
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth C. Buckley 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Burress 
Mr. and Mrs. M. R. Campbell 
Mr. and Mrs. Donald B. Caton 
Mr. and Mrs. Abraham Cohen 
Mrs. Martin M. Cohen 
Mr. Louis A. Coulis 
Mr. Isidore Dauber 
Mrs. Ford Duncan 

Sponsors 



Mrs. A. Behrens Figman 

Mrs. Signe K. Fogelberg 

Mr. and Mrs. John P. Grant 

Mr. and Mrs. David Gutstein 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Haft 

Mr. and Mrs. Nathan R. Herzberg 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Hurst 

Dr. and Mrs. Santo Immordino 

Mr. H. L. Kilburn 

Mr. William J. Klein 

Mrs. Irene Kovach 



Mr. and Mrs. Alan Kraut 
Mr. and Mrs. Louis F. Kreek 
Mr. Winslow M. Lovejoy 
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Margolies 
Mr. and Mrs. Emanuel E. Margolies 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Miller 
Mrs. Howard C. Moloy 
Mrs. Miles Murphy- 
Mr. and Mrs. Nat Nisonson 
Mrs. Virginia M. Nixon 
Mr. Herbert V. Parry 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph H. Pascal 
Mrs. Mary E. Pease 
Mr. and Mrs. Ralph E. Puchner 
Mr. and Mrs. Ganson Purcell 
Mr. and Mrs. John T. Reber 
Mrs. Jane A. Reese 
Dr. and Mrs. Leon Schiff 
Dr. and Mrs. Saul A. Schwartz 
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Seidenberg 
Mr. and Mrs. Philip Sherman 
Dr. and Mrs. Bernard E. Silver 
Mr. and Mrs. Eugene J. Steiner 
Mr. and Mrs. Albert J. Ulin 
Mr. John Valuska 
Dr. and Mrs. Peter Vogel 
Mr. and Mrs. Forrest F. Weight 
Dr. and Mrs. Robert M. Winslow 
Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Zeft 



STAFF 



Editor Robinette Bell 

Managing Editor Leonard Dauber 

Photographic Editor Herman Frankel 

Advertising Manager Ian Nisonson 

Associate Editors: Peter Immordino, Timothy Schuster. 

Assistant Editors: Donald Bell, Robert Gutstein, William Klein. 

Photographic Staff: Leonard Dauber, John Kovach, Joel Kraut, 
Ian Nisonson. 

Advertising Staff : Donald Caton, Peter Immordino, Nicholas Romas. 

Caption Committee: Robert Pascal, Editor; Robinette Bell, 
Leonard Dauber, Howard Dubin, Robert Gutstein, 
Peter Immordino, William Klein, Ian Nisonson, 
Timothy Schuster. 

Acknowledgements: H. G. Roebuck and Son (Printers) , 

Harry Gilbert of Roger Studios (Portrait Photographer) , 
Public Information and Elizabeth Wilcox, Edwin M. Barton, 
and Lena Schlafmitz (P & S Club) , B. Wolfram (Alumni 
Office) , Shih-Chun Wang. 






Right: Robin Bell with her two '62 creations: the year- 
book and Suzanne. Above: Len Dauber who had some- 
thing to do with the first but denies t'other. 




100 



c.\ 

H-Co(\<uct, 



COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 



0064260259